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Friend forwarded this to me...

 

TTAA00 KPHL 070822

 

STATE FORECAST DISCUSSION

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PHILADELPHIA/MOUNT HOLLY NJ

320 AM EST SUN JAN 7 1996

 

ANYWAY YOU SLICE IT IF UCCELLINI AND KOCIN DO A PART DEUX...THIS ONE

MIGHT REPLACE MA138 ON THE FRONT COVER. 

 

BLIZZARD WRNGS WILL BE POSTED FOR SERN ZNS AS STORM INTENSIFIES EAST

OF NJ/DELMARVA THIS EVE/MON AM.  ALMOST A PERFECT DAY 4/5 LONG RANGE

PROG FOR THE ECMWF...ALTHO IT LISTENED TOO MUCH TO THE MRF IN THE MID

RANGE.             

 

NO DISCRENPANCIES WITH MDLS THIS RUN.  TEXTBOOK WINTER STORM AS LOW

CLOSES OFF AND INTENSIFIES...SEEMS TO TRAP SFC LOW TNGT DRAGGING OUT

PCPN EVENT.  MAX SNOWFALL AS FLOW NR SFC INTENSIFIES AND 850 MB JET

REACHES 50 KT PLUS THIS EVE STRAIGHT OUT OF THE E.

 

BIGGEST QUES IS HOW FAR NW TO GO WITH THE WRNGS.  AS WITH MOST

CLASSIC SNOWSTROMS THERE WILL BE A SHARP CUT-OFF.  OUR THINKING IS

IT/LL BE SOMEWHERE IN THE UPPER SUSQ VLY.  THUS WE/RE GOING TO GO

WITH A SNOW ADVSRY THERE AND HOIST WINT STORM WRNGS OVER THE MID SUSQ

VLY AND AVP METRO AREA.  MDL QPFS MIGHT BE OVERDONE TO THE LEE OF THE

BLUE MTNS/POCONOS...BUT HIGH 20 TO 25:1 RATIO MIGHT BRING 6 INCH PLUS

TO THOSE AREAS.

 

MDLS SEEM TO BE KEYING ON NJ AND DELMARVA AS THE AXIS OF HEAVIEST

SNOW AS THIS IS THE RGN OF STGST THETA E/WAA ADVTCN...LONGEST

DURATION OF DVRG ALF AND OVER WHICH THE 700 MB LOW PASSES. 

 

WILL WIND DOWN STORM ON MON...BUT PASSAGE OF COMMA HEAD WILL PROBABLY

KEEP SW- GOING THRU THE AFTN IN MOST ZONES.  BUT FOR NOW...SINCE

MAXIMUM WINDS ASSOCD WITH LOW SHLD BE DURG THE EVE HRS...WILL NOT

EXTEND THE BLIZZARD WRNG BEYOND TNGT.

 

MAR:  CFW WRNG IN EFFECT FOR TNGT AND MON AM.  THE USUALLY LWR AVN

STORM SURGE GUID IS HIER AND ITS SFC LWR IS FTHR OFSHR.  FCTS OF

"CAPTURE" OF SFC LOW BY CLSD LOW ALF SHLD PROLONG THIS EVENT INTO TWO

TIDE CYCLES.  FIRST ONE THIS EVE IS LWR ASTRONOMICALLY AND SHLD BE

MDT FLOODING TNGT...WITH MDT PSBLY SVR FLOODING WITH MON AM HI TIDES.

IF THIS COMES TO FRUITION...THIS WOULD BE THE WORST TIDAL FLOODG ALGB

THE NJ CST SINCE THE HALLOWEEN STORM OF 1991.  WILL ALSO HOIST STORM

WRNGS ON BOTH THE BAY AND OCEAN.

 

IN CONCLUSION PICK A NAME: STORM OF THE CENTURY II

                THE EAGLE'S BLIZZARD (IF THEY WERE ONLY PLAYING HERE)

                THE SHUTDOWN BLIZZARD

 

WRKZNS ABT 4 AM.

               

.PHI...BLIZZARD WRNG THRU TNGT FOR LWR LWR SUSQ ZNS...SRN POCONOS...

       LEHIGH VALLEY...SERN PA ZNS...ALL NJ/DE AND MD ZONES.

       WINT STORM (HVY SNOW) WRNGS FOR MID SUSQ/REST OF POCONOS...AVP

       METRO AREA AND UPPER PARTS OF THE LWR SUSQ VLY.

       SNOW ADVSRY FOR UPR SUSQ ZNS (37>39/41>43.

       CSTL FLD WARNG FOR SUSSEX CTY DELAWARE AND CSTL NJ

       STORM WRNG FOR DE BAY AND CSTL WTRS.

 

TFG

 

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Only time in 40 years the giant snowblower with the fan blade in the front came down my road. Threw snow plume over the roof of my house as it passed by. Neighbor saw it coming and ran for cover as did I.

Let's just say our neighbor left us her snow thrower because she moved to Tampa and it was no match. I think it was on the very next bus to Tampa.

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I would like to see the winter storm/blizzard warning write up..does TFG have that too?

 

Actual warning, TFG can't find.

 

The Blizzard of '96, the second coined "STORM OF THE CENTURY" of this decade brought record breaking snow to most of Southeast Pennsylvania and paralyzed the region for several days, caused most municipalities to exceed their annual snow budgets during this one storm, caused several building collapses and caused directly or directly 42 deaths and countless injuries. Six persons died of hypothermia, 4 in Philadelphia, 1 in Delaware County and 1 in Lehigh County. Some were homeless persons, but one woman in Allentown accidentally locked herself out of her home. Twenty-nine persons suffered heart attacks and died while shoveling snow, using snowblowers or trying to walk in the deep snow. A Delaware County man died of carbon monoxide poisoning after his vehicle's tail pipe was not cleared of snow. Two persons in Philadelphia also died of carbon monoxide poisoning within their home. A snow-blocked fire hydrant contributed to the death of one person in a Bucks County fire. A Montgomery County man crashed and died in Upper Dublin Township on Pennsylvania State Route 309 when his vehicle struck an overpass. Another Montgomery County man died while he was riding on an inner tube and slid underneath a parked vehicle. The weight of the snow caused the collapse of a greenhouse in Exeter Township and killed one man.

The number of deaths and injuries was reduced by the storm starting before dawn on Sunday with blizzard conditions in full force by the early afternoon. The storm formed in the Gulf of Mexico on the morning of the 6th, moved south of Alabama the evening of the 6th, reached Savannah Georgia the morning of the 7th, Cape Hatteras the evening of the 7th, moved just to the west of the Delaware Bay Buoy the morning of the 8th before reaching the Southern New England Coastal Waters the evening of the 8th. This was a classic a storm track for heavy snow. Precipitation was all snow in Pennsylvania. Snow began falling during the predawn hours on the 7th and became heavy at times during the morning. Blizzard conditions developed during the afternoon and evening as strong northeast winds developed around the intensifying low. There was a lull in the precipitation after midnight on the 8th, before some wraparound snow returned during the daylight hours.

This was a very difficult snow to measure due to the strong winds and powdery nature of the snow. All-time single storm records were set at both the Lehigh Valley International Airport (25.6 inches) and Philadelphia International Airport (30.7 inches). It should be noted the 30.7 inches represents a SNOWFALL ESTIMATE. Due to the considerable blowing and drifting of the snow, the observers at the airport were forced to use a water equivalent/snowfall estimate table. The actual ACCUMULATION was probably less. Snowfall accumulations averaged 20 to 22 inches in Monroe and Carbon Counties, around 2 feet in Lehigh and Northampton Counties, 24 to 33 inches in Berks County, 20 to 26 inches in Chester and Delaware Counties, 20 to 30 inches in Montgomery and Bucks Counties and 27 inches in Philadelphia. Other individual accumulations included 33 inches in Ontelaunee Township (Berks), 30 inches in Reading (Berks) and Palm and Souderton (Montgomery), 28 inches in Perkasie (Bucks), 27 inches in Philadelphia (Franklin Institute) and 26 inches in Glenmoore (Chester).

A state of emergency was declared on Sunday the 7th and wasn't lifted until 6 a.m. on Tuesday the 9th. The National Guard assisted the state with snow removals and rescues. Four wheel drive vehicles were used to transport emergency personnel and patients. Humvees were used to clear the larger drifts that reached as high as 15 feet in Chester County. There was no postal deliveries on the 8th. Some schools were closed the whole week. All major airports were closed. Philadelphia International had one runway open as of 6 pm on the 8th. The Reading Regional Airport was reopened on Tuesday the 9th. The snow was so deep on Philadelphia's side streets that plows were unable to go down them. This problem also affected firefighters. The blocked side streets helped contribute to a fire which cost two Philadelphia families their home. Homeless shelters in Phialdelphia set a new record.

The unprecedented snow also caused numerous building collapses throughout the area, especially in Berks County. Some of the worse ones included the Atlas Roofing Company in Richland Township (Bucks County), the East Penn Manufacturing Company near Lyons (Berks County) and the Penn Crest Gardens Apartments in South Whitehall Township (Lehigh County). Thirty-five residents were evacuated from one building after the roof buckled.

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I would like to see the winter storm/blizzard warning write up..does TFG have that too?

Here ya go...

BULLETIN - IMMEDIATE BROADCAST REQUESTEDBLIZZARD WARNING...BLIZZARD CONDITIONS THIS AFTERNOON AND TONIGHTNATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PHILADELPHIA PA/MOUNT HOLLY NJ445 AM EST SUN JAN 7 1996A BLIZZARD WARNING HAS BEEN ISSUED FOR LATER TODAY THROUGH MONDAYMORNING FOR MUCH OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF PENNSYLVANIA INCLUDINGTHE SOUTHERN PORTIONS OF THE SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY...ALL OF NEW JERSEY...ALL OF DELAWARE...AND NORTHEASTERN MARYLAND.THIS BLIZZARD WARNING INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING EASTERN PENNSYLVANIACOUNTIES...CARBON...MONROE...BERKS...LEHIGH...NORTHAMPTON...ADAMS...YORK...LANCASTER...CHESTER...MONTGOMERY...BUCKS...DELAWARE...AND PHILADELPHIA.IN NEW JERSEY THE COUNTIES INCLUDED ARE...SUSSEX...WARREN...MORRIS...HUNTERDON...SOMERSET...MIDDLESEX...MONMOUTH...MERCER...SALEM...GLOUCESTER...CAMDEN...BURLINGTON...OCEAN...ATLANTIC...CUMBERLAND...AND CAPE MAY.IN DELAWARE THIS BLIZZARD WARNING INCLUDES THESE COUNTIES...NEW CASTLE...KENT...AND SUSSEX.IN NORTHEAST MARYLAND THE COUNTIES IN THE WARNING ARE...CECIL...KENT...QUEEN ANNE/S...TALBOT...AND CAROLINE.WARNING DEFINITION...A BLIZZARD WARNING MEANS THAT SUSTAINEDWINDS OF 35 MPH OR GREATER ARE EXPECTED...ALONG WITH FALLING AND/OR BLOWING SNOW FREQUENTLY REDUCING VISIBILITY TO LESSTHAN 1/4 MILE. MAKE PREPARATIONS NOW TO DEAL WITH EXPECTEDHEAVY SNOW ACCUMULATIONS AND GREATLY IMPAIRED TRAVEL TODAYAND TONIGHT.ON THE WEATHER MAP...A STRENGTHENING STORM WILL MOVE FROM THEGULF COAST EARLY THIS MORNING TO EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA LATERTODAY...AND TO A POSITION OFF THE MID ATLANTIC COAST BY MONDAYMORNING. THE NORTHEAST FLOW AROUND THIS STORM WILL BRING PLENTY OF ATLANTIC OCEAN MOISTURE INTO OUR AREA WHICH WILL COMBINE WITH THE VERY COLD AIR ALREADY IN PLACE TO PRODUCEHEAVY SNOW ACCUMULATIONS. EXPECTED WEATHER CONDITIONS...SNOW WHICH BEGAN JUST AFTERMIDNIGHT OVER NORTHEASTERN MARYLAND AND DELAWARE...AND SLIGHTLY LATER OVER SOUTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA AND SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY...WILL ACCUMULATE SEVERAL INCHES BY DAYBREAK. UP TO TWO FEET OF SNOW IS POSSIBLE IN THESE AREAS BY THE TIME THE STORM STOPS LATE SUNDAY OR EARLY MONDAY MORNING. SLIGHTLYLESSER AMOUNTS ARE POSSIBLE IN SUSSEX COUNTY DELAWARE...CAPEMAY COUNTY NEW JERSEY AND COASTAL ATLANTIC COUNTY NEW JERSEYWHERE SOME MIXING WITH RAIN AND SLEET COULD OCCUR LATE SUNDAY.SINCE TEMPERATURES ARE SO COLD...THE SNOW WHICH FALLS TODAY WILL BE DRY AND POWDERY. WITH NORTHEAST WINDS EXPECTED TO INCREASE AS THE DAY WEARS ON...BLOWING AND DRIFTING WILLREDUCE VISIBILITIES TO LESS THAN 1/4 MILE. SNOW WILL SPREADINTO NORTHERN PENNSYLVANIA AND NORTHERN NEW JERSEY AFTER DAYBREAK TODAY. THE HEAVIEST SNOW IS EXPECTED FOR LATER THISMORNING AND TONIGHT AS THE STORM/S ENERGY WILL BE GREATESTAT THAT TIME.NORTHEAST WINDS WILL BECOME QUITE STRONG LATER TODAY...POSSIBLY AS HIGH AS 30 TO 40 MILES AN HOUR WITH GUSTS AROUND50 MPH ALONG THE COAST. THIS WILL CREATE BLIZZARD CONDITIONSLATER TODAY AND TONIGHT...AND SIGNIFICANT BLOWING AND DRIFTING OF SNOW WILL OCCUR.FORECAST SNOWFALL AMOUNTS...THE HEAVIEST SNOW...WITH AMOUNTSOF AROUND 2 FEET...IS LIKELY TO OCCUR FROM NORTHEASTERN MARYLAND AND DELAWARE THROUGH SOUTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA ANDMOST OF NEW JERSEY. 15 TO 20 INCHES OF SNOW IS LIKELY OVERTHE LOWER SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY AND NORTHEAST INTO THE LEHIGH VALLEY AND NORTHWESTERN NEW JERSEY. 12 TO 18 INCHES IS EXPECTED OVER THE CENTRAL SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY AND POCONO MOUNTAIN SECTIONS OF PENNSYLVANIA...WITH 3 TO 6 INCHES EXPECTED OVER THE NORTH CENTRAL PORTIONS OF THE STATE.PLEASE STRONGLY CONSIDER STAYING AT HOME OR IN ANY PLACE YOU FIND YOURSELF TODAY AND TONIGHT. TRAVEL THROUGH TONIGHTWILL BE DOWNRIGHT DANGEROUS. VEHICLES SHOULD HAVE SNOW TIRESOR TIRES CAPABLE OF TRAVEL IN SNOW. YOU SHOULD HAVE AN EMERGENCY PACK FOR YOUR CAR IF TRAVEL IS INDEED NECESSARY.THIS SHOULD INCLUDE AT LEAST A WORKING FLASHLIGHT WITH EXTRABATTERIES...BLANKETS...A SHOVEL AND OTHER EQUIPMENT NECESSARYFOR EMERGENCIES. AT HOME...HAVE EXTRA FOOD ON HAND...WITH SOME OF IT NEEDING NO PREPARATION IN CASE YOUR POWER FAILS. MAKE SURE YOU HAVE ENOUGH GASOLINE OR HEATING FUEL. MAKE SUREYOUR EXHAUST PIPE IS FREE OF SNOW. CARBON MONOXIDE POISONINGOCCURS RAPIDLY. THINK ABOUT WHAT YOU/LL DO IF THE POWER GOESOUT...ESPECIALLY SINCE THIS WILL BE A WINDY STORM AND SOMEPOWER LINES COULD GO DOWN.THIS STORM HAS THE POTENTIAL TO BE THE HEAVIEST SNOW ON RECORD IN A LARGE PART OF THE WARNING AREA...ESPECIALLY INPHILADELPHIA...ATLANTIC CITY AND WILMINGTON.$$JJM
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I don't why I could not find the Jersey or Delaware discussions. 

Found it hidden in the High Wind event https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/stormevents/eventdetails.jsp?id=5546200

 

The Blizzard of '96, the second coined "STORM OF THE CENTURY" of this decade brought record breaking snow to most of New Jersey and paralyzed the region for several days, caused most municipalities to exceed their annual snow budgets during this one storm, caused several building collapses, its high winds caused 57,000 homes to lose power, caused directly or indirectly 28 deaths and countless injuries and produced moderate flooding with moderate to severe beach erosion from Manasquan south along the New Jersey Shore. Four women died of hypothermia, one each in Atlantic, Burlington, Mercer and Ocean Counties. Twenty-three persons suffered heart attacks and died while shoveling snow, using snowblowers or trying to walk in the deep snow. One traffic fatality occurred early in the storm as a car slid off the Atlantic City Expressway and hit a tree during the predawn hours of the 7th in Hammonton.

The number of deaths and injuries was reduced by the storm starting before dawn on Sunday with blizzard conditions in full force during the afternoon. The storm formed in the Gulf of Mexico on the morning of the 6th, moved south of Alabama the evening of the 6th, reached Savannah Georgia the morning of the 7th, Cape Hatteras the evening of the 7th, moved just to the west of the Delaware Bay Buoy the morning of the 8th before reaching the Southern New England coastal waters the evening of the 8th. This was a classic a storm track for heavy snow. Precipitation was all snow in Northwest New Jersey, fell as mostly snow with some sleet in Central and Southwest New Jersey and started as snow, but changed to sleet and freezing rain before ending as snow in Southeast New Jersey. Snow began falling during the predawn hours on the 7th and became heavy at times during the morning. Blizzard conditions developed during the afternoon and evening as strong northeast winds developed around the intensifying low. There was a lull in the precipitation after midnight on the 8th, before some wraparound snow returned during the daylight hours.

A state of emergency was declared by Governor Whitman on the 7th and was not lifted until the 13th. The state was also declared a disaster area with storm related costs topping 50 million dollars. A driving ban was in effect from the 7th to the morning of the 9th. There was no postal delivery on the 8th. Some schools started opening on Wednesday the 10th. The National Guard helped with snow removal and four wheel drive vehicles were used to transport medical personnel and patients to and from hospitals. The New Jersey Turnpike was closed for its entire length the first time in its 48 year history. More than 1000 cars had to be towed from major New Jersey highways on Sunday. Persons were trapped at rest stops, especially in the northern half of the state. The high winds and powdery snow made it very difficult for road crews to keep roadways open. Drifts reached 12 feet.

Snowfall accumulations averaged 18 to 28 inches with a few higher amounts across North Central New Jersey and lower amounts in Southeast New Jersey. Accumulations averaged 24 to 27 inches in Sussex County, 20 to 27 inches in Warren County, 23 to 28 inches in Morris County, 20 to 30 inches in Hunterdon, Somerset, Mercer and Monmouth Counties, 19 to 32 inches in Middlesex County, 18 to 31 inches in Burlington County, 16 to 24 inches in Salem, Gloucester and Camden Counties, 24 inches inland and 10 to 14 inches at the coast in Ocean County and 10 to 18 inches in Atlantic, Cape May and Cumberland Counties. Specific accumulations included 32 inches in Edison, 31 inches in Bordentown, 30 inches in Whitehouse Station, Raritan and Howell, 28 inches in Long Valley and Freehold, 27 inches at McGuire AFB, Charlotteburg, Hackettstown and Newton, 24 inches in Pennsauken, Chatham and Dover (Ocean County), 22 inches in Belle Mead, New Brunswick, Mount Holly and Somerdale, 15 inches in Beach Haven, Millville and Pomona and 12 inches in Pleasantville and Cape May City.

In addition to the heavy snow, wind gusts reached hurricane force along the coast during the evening of the 7th. An 81 mph gust was recorded in Ocean Grove. Eight housing additions in Manasquan collapsed. Navigation Tower aides at Point Pleasant and Manasquan were toppled. Jersey Central Power and Light reported 14,500 homes lost power, 8,000 occurred in Middlesex, Monmouth and Ocean Counties. Atlantic Electric reported 45,000 homes lost power between 10 p.m. on the 7th and 2 a.m. on the 8th, 20,000 within Cape May County. The power problems were exacerbated in Southeast New Jersey by the combination of freezing rain and sleet that was falling during the high winds. Public Service Electric and Gas reported about 3,000 homes lost power, mainly in Somerset County.

While accumulations were lighter along the shore, the strong northeast flow around the low produced moderate tidal flooding around the evening high tide on the 7th. Tides were three to four feet above normal. Luckily this did not coincide with spring tides and was the lower of the two high tides for the day. The tide reached 7.5 ft above mean low water in Atlantic City and 8.5 ft above mean low water in Cape May. The winds shifted to the northwest Monday morning just in time to prevent worse flooding.

Evacuations of some coastal residents occurred in Belmar, Port Monmouth, Sea Bright and Manasquan in Monmouth County. Street flooding was reported in these areas and also in Avon. In Sea Bright, flooding from the Shrewsbury River exacerbated the flooding. New Jersey State Route 36 was closed from the Highlands/Sea Bright Bridge through Monmouth Beach. In Ocean County, there was bayside flooding in Point Pleasant. Shelters were open in Stafford and Berkley Townships. In Atlantic County, the Black Horse Pike was closed because of tidal flooding. The 34th St. Causeway flooded in Margate. Red Cross Shelters were opened in Brigantine, Atlantic City, Somers Point and Ventnor. Evacuations included a nursing home in Atlantic City. Minor tidal flooding was reported elsewhere in Atlantic City and also in Longport, Margate and Ventnor. Large sand-filled "geotubes" were given credit for saving Atlantic City from further property damage. In Cape May County, about 60 persons were evacuated from North Wildwood, Ocean City, Sea Isle City and West Wildwood. Cars were stuck in the tidal flooding in North Wildwood. About 100 homes were damaged by bay flooding in West Wildwood. Some tidal flooding was also reported in Avalon on Ocean and Dune Drives. Other roads closed due to flooding were the 9th Street Bridge and West Avenue in Ocean City and the George Redding Bridge in Wildwood.

By far the worst damage done along the coast was the erosion. Its estimated about $26 million worth of sand was scoured away by the blizzard leaving some locations vulnerable to future storms with the worst damage from Manasquan southward. In Manasquan the storm scoured vertically about four feet of beach for a 500 foot stretch. In Ocean County severe erosion was reported by almost every township along the shore. In Brant Beach, a breach occurred at 51st Street as the dunes washed away. Six homes built atop of pilings were hanging over the ocean. In Harvey Cedars, about 500,000 cubic yards (Estimated cost $4 million) of sand was lost leaving two to five foot cliffs. Many of its snow fences were torn away. The beaches were in very serious condition in Mantaloking (100,000 cubic yards of sand lost.) and Lavalette (About $2 million of sand lost.). In Atlantic County, the beaches in front of Atlantic City's Claridge Hotel and Casino and Convention Hall were virtually gone. Ventnor lost about six to eight feet of beach. In Brigantine, damage was done to the north end sea wall. In Cape May County, severe erosion was reported in Sea Isle City (Eight blocks of dune lost on the north side of town with up to 10 feet of beach lost.), Stratmere (Heavy erosion south side of town.), Stone Harbor, Townsends Inlet (Fifteen foot gaps made between the dunes.) and Cape May Point State Park (Lost up to 15 feet of sand.). The pounding surf also washed-up a large number of clams in Upper Township, Sea Isle City and North Wildwood. About 2.5 million clams washed ashore.

The weight of the snow also led to several building or roof collapses throughout the state. These included a TJ Maxx in Edison Township, Schroeder Brother Construction in Warren Township, a Pepsi-Cola bottling plant in Ocean Township, a health club on New Jersey State Route 41 in Deptford with one injury and a Sonoco Products Division in Monmouth Junction.

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Same for Delaware, buried in the high wind event: https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/stormevents/eventdetails.jsp?id=5546206

 

The Blizzard of '96, the second coined "STORM OF THE CENTURY" of this decade, brought record breaking snow to the northern half of Delaware and paralyzed the state for a couple of days and caused most municipalities to exceed their annual snow budgets during this one storm. Its high winds caused 5,000 homes to lose power, suspended operations on the Cape May-Lewes Ferry for five days, caused directly or indirectly 10 deaths and numerous injuries and produced moderate flooding with moderate to severe beach erosion along the shore. All the deaths were caused by persons shoveling, using snow blowers or trying to walk through the snow.

The number of deaths and injuries was reduced by the storm starting before dawn on Sunday with blizzard conditions in full force in northern areas during the afternoon. The storm formed in the Gulf of Mexico on the morning of the 6th, moved south of Alabama the evening of the 6th, reached Savannah Georgia the morning of the 7th, Cape Hatteras the evening of the 7th, moved just to the west of the Delaware Bay Buoy the morning of the 8th before reaching the Southern New England Coastal Waters the evening of the 8th. This was a classic track for a Nor'easter. Precipitation was mainly snow in New Castle County; fell as snow and sleet through sunset on the 7th, then some freezing rain the night of the 7th before changing back to snow before ending on the 8th in Kent County; it started as snow, but changed to sleet and freezing rain and then rain for a while Sunday evening (7th) before ending as snow the morning of the 8th in Sussex County. Snow began falling around Midnight in Sussex County and spread through the rest of the state during the predawn hours on the 7th and became heavy at times by sunrise. Blizzard conditions developed during the afternoon and evening in New Castle County as strong northeast winds developed around the intensifying low. Precipitation was lighter after midnight on the 8th, before some wraparound snow returned during the daylight hours.

A state of emergency was declared by Governor Carper on the 7th, was replaced by a limited state of emergency the morning of the 9th and was not lifted completely until the evening of the 10th. The state was also declared a disaster area with storm related costs topping 4 million dollars, $725,000 within Wilmington. This damage estimate did not include the amount of sand lost by erosion. Some colleges started opening on Wednesday the 10th with some elementary schools opening on the 11th. The National Guard helped with snow removal and four wheel drive vehicles were used to transport medical personnel and patients to and from hospitals. The high winds and powdery snow made it very difficult for road crews to keep roadways open. Drifts reached around 6 feet. The weight of the snow caused several building collapses, one of the worst was the roof collapse of the Talleyville Shopping Center on the 10th.

Snowfall accumulations averaged 18 to 24 inches in New Castle County, 12 to 20 inches in Kent County and 6 to 16 inches in Sussex County with the highest amounts well inland. The 22.7 inches of snow that fell at the New Castle County Airport set a new 24 hour snowfall and all-time single storm snow record. Other accumulations from around the state included 24 inches in Odessa and Prices Corner, 22 inches in Middletown and Newark, 20 inches in Pennyhill and Smyrna, 18 inches in Newark and Harrington, 11.5 inches in Georgetown, 10 inches in Lewes and Bridgeville and 8 inches in Dewey Beach.

In addition to the heavy snow, wind gusts reached hurricane force along the coast during the evening of the 7th. An 84 mph gust was recorded at the Pilot Tower at Cape Henlopen and wind gusts reached 60 mph in Bethany Beach. The strong winds helped topple power lines in Sussex County and the freezing rain caused some power outages in Kent County. The Delaware Electric Cooperative reported about 5,000 homes without power mainly between 7 pm and midnight on the 7th. The wind was strong enough to overturn a tractor trailer in Sussex County.

While accumulations were lighter along the shore, the strong northeast flow around the low produced moderate tidal flooding around the high tide the evening of the 7th. Tides were three to four feet above normal. Luckily this did not coincide with spring tides or the higher of the two high tides for the day. Dunes were breached in Dewey Beach, South Bethany Beach and along "the curve" just north of Fenwick Island. In Dewey Beach there was a washover onto Delaware State Route 1. Debris clogged the roadway. Flooding from both the ocean and Assawoman Bay closed both Delaware State Routes 1 and 54. Tidal flooding from Assawoman Bay flooded side streets on Fenwick Island and South Bethany Beach. Two feet of water was reported along side streets in Bethany Beach. Northwest winds Monday morning prevented tidal flooding from getting worse.

The worst problem was the severe beach erosion, especially on the ocean side of Sussex County. In Dewey Beach, 75 percent of a $3 million dollar beach replenishment project was washed away. In South Bethany the erosion rivaled the January 1992 storm. In Bethany Beach a $23,000 plastic mesh fence was ruined. Seven staircases and two wave bulkheads were damaged. The sea wall in Rehobeth Beach was damaged and a set of stairs were washed away.

The state was declared a disaster area on the 16th.

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Here ya go...

BULLETIN - IMMEDIATE BROADCAST REQUESTED

BLIZZARD WARNING...BLIZZARD CONDITIONS THIS AFTERNOON AND TONIGHT

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PHILADELPHIA PA/MOUNT HOLLY NJ

445 AM EST SUN JAN 7 1996

A BLIZZARD WARNING HAS BEEN ISSUED FOR LATER TODAY THROUGH MONDAY

MORNING FOR MUCH OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF PENNSYLVANIA INCLUDING

THE SOUTHERN PORTIONS OF THE SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY...ALL OF NEW

JERSEY...ALL OF DELAWARE...AND NORTHEASTERN MARYLAND.

THIS BLIZZARD WARNING INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA

COUNTIES...

CARBON...MONROE...BERKS...LEHIGH...NORTHAMPTON...ADAMS...YORK...

LANCASTER...CHESTER...MONTGOMERY...BUCKS...DELAWARE...AND

PHILADELPHIA.

IN NEW JERSEY THE COUNTIES INCLUDED ARE...

SUSSEX...WARREN...MORRIS...HUNTERDON...SOMERSET...MIDDLESEX...

MONMOUTH...MERCER...SALEM...GLOUCESTER...CAMDEN...BURLINGTON...

OCEAN...ATLANTIC...CUMBERLAND...AND CAPE MAY.

IN DELAWARE THIS BLIZZARD WARNING INCLUDES THESE COUNTIES...

NEW CASTLE...KENT...AND SUSSEX.

IN NORTHEAST MARYLAND THE COUNTIES IN THE WARNING ARE...

CECIL...KENT...QUEEN ANNE/S...TALBOT...AND CAROLINE.

WARNING DEFINITION...A BLIZZARD WARNING MEANS THAT SUSTAINED

WINDS OF 35 MPH OR GREATER ARE EXPECTED...ALONG WITH FALLING

AND/OR BLOWING SNOW FREQUENTLY REDUCING VISIBILITY TO LESS

THAN 1/4 MILE. MAKE PREPARATIONS NOW TO DEAL WITH EXPECTED

HEAVY SNOW ACCUMULATIONS AND GREATLY IMPAIRED TRAVEL TODAY

AND TONIGHT.

ON THE WEATHER MAP...A STRENGTHENING STORM WILL MOVE FROM THE

GULF COAST EARLY THIS MORNING TO EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA LATER

TODAY...AND TO A POSITION OFF THE MID ATLANTIC COAST BY MONDAY

MORNING. THE NORTHEAST FLOW AROUND THIS STORM WILL BRING

PLENTY OF ATLANTIC OCEAN MOISTURE INTO OUR AREA WHICH WILL

COMBINE WITH THE VERY COLD AIR ALREADY IN PLACE TO PRODUCE

HEAVY SNOW ACCUMULATIONS.

EXPECTED WEATHER CONDITIONS...SNOW WHICH BEGAN JUST AFTER

MIDNIGHT OVER NORTHEASTERN MARYLAND AND DELAWARE...AND

SLIGHTLY LATER OVER SOUTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA AND SOUTHERN

NEW JERSEY...WILL ACCUMULATE SEVERAL INCHES BY DAYBREAK. UP

TO TWO FEET OF SNOW IS POSSIBLE IN THESE AREAS BY THE TIME

THE STORM STOPS LATE SUNDAY OR EARLY MONDAY MORNING. SLIGHTLY

LESSER AMOUNTS ARE POSSIBLE IN SUSSEX COUNTY DELAWARE...CAPE

MAY COUNTY NEW JERSEY AND COASTAL ATLANTIC COUNTY NEW JERSEY

WHERE SOME MIXING WITH RAIN AND SLEET COULD OCCUR LATE SUNDAY.

SINCE TEMPERATURES ARE SO COLD...THE SNOW WHICH FALLS TODAY

WILL BE DRY AND POWDERY. WITH NORTHEAST WINDS EXPECTED TO

INCREASE AS THE DAY WEARS ON...BLOWING AND DRIFTING WILL

REDUCE VISIBILITIES TO LESS THAN 1/4 MILE. SNOW WILL SPREAD

INTO NORTHERN PENNSYLVANIA AND NORTHERN NEW JERSEY AFTER

DAYBREAK TODAY. THE HEAVIEST SNOW IS EXPECTED FOR LATER THIS

MORNING AND TONIGHT AS THE STORM/S ENERGY WILL BE GREATEST

AT THAT TIME.

NORTHEAST WINDS WILL BECOME QUITE STRONG LATER TODAY...

POSSIBLY AS HIGH AS 30 TO 40 MILES AN HOUR WITH GUSTS AROUND

50 MPH ALONG THE COAST. THIS WILL CREATE BLIZZARD CONDITIONS

LATER TODAY AND TONIGHT...AND SIGNIFICANT BLOWING AND

DRIFTING OF SNOW WILL OCCUR.

FORECAST SNOWFALL AMOUNTS...THE HEAVIEST SNOW...WITH AMOUNTS

OF AROUND 2 FEET...IS LIKELY TO OCCUR FROM NORTHEASTERN

MARYLAND AND DELAWARE THROUGH SOUTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA AND

MOST OF NEW JERSEY. 15 TO 20 INCHES OF SNOW IS LIKELY OVER

THE LOWER SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY AND NORTHEAST INTO THE LEHIGH

VALLEY AND NORTHWESTERN NEW JERSEY. 12 TO 18 INCHES IS

EXPECTED OVER THE CENTRAL SUSQUEHANNA VALLEY AND POCONO

MOUNTAIN SECTIONS OF PENNSYLVANIA...WITH 3 TO 6 INCHES

EXPECTED OVER THE NORTH CENTRAL PORTIONS OF THE STATE.

PLEASE STRONGLY CONSIDER STAYING AT HOME OR IN ANY PLACE

YOU FIND YOURSELF TODAY AND TONIGHT. TRAVEL THROUGH TONIGHT

WILL BE DOWNRIGHT DANGEROUS. VEHICLES SHOULD HAVE SNOW TIRES

OR TIRES CAPABLE OF TRAVEL IN SNOW. YOU SHOULD HAVE AN

EMERGENCY PACK FOR YOUR CAR IF TRAVEL IS INDEED NECESSARY.

THIS SHOULD INCLUDE AT LEAST A WORKING FLASHLIGHT WITH EXTRA

BATTERIES...BLANKETS...A SHOVEL AND OTHER EQUIPMENT NECESSARY

FOR EMERGENCIES. AT HOME...HAVE EXTRA FOOD ON HAND...WITH

SOME OF IT NEEDING NO PREPARATION IN CASE YOUR POWER FAILS.

MAKE SURE YOU HAVE ENOUGH GASOLINE OR HEATING FUEL. MAKE SURE

YOUR EXHAUST PIPE IS FREE OF SNOW. CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING

OCCURS RAPIDLY. THINK ABOUT WHAT YOU/LL DO IF THE POWER GOES

OUT...ESPECIALLY SINCE THIS WILL BE A WINDY STORM AND SOME

POWER LINES COULD GO DOWN.

THIS STORM HAS THE POTENTIAL TO BE THE HEAVIEST SNOW ON

RECORD IN A LARGE PART OF THE WARNING AREA...ESPECIALLY IN

PHILADELPHIA...ATLANTIC CITY AND WILMINGTON.

$$

JJM

I'm sure JJM was complaining back then about that weather was so active here.
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