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Miller B's - Coastal Redevelopment KU Storms


chescowx
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I went back and looked at the identified Miller B type storms as identified in the case studies in Northeast Snowstorms by Paul Kocin and Lou Uccelllini.

I wanted to see how often these type of redevelop storms totally miss the western Philly burbs. I know many folks think these storms miss us quite often to the east/northeast. I can clearly remember the 12/30-31, 2000 storm waking up in Chester County and watching heavy snow in downtown Philly while where I was it was partly sunny. That one is the last in the list. I don't have Philadelphia's totals for these handy but I may add those later in case someone else has them. I would imagine Philly should have recorded more snow in many of these events.

 

Below are the storms and the recorded snowfall recorded by the NWS observer in Coatesville PA ( I also added the Feb and December 2010 Boxing Day Storm to the list)

 

March 18-20, 1956 - 10.0"

March 2-5, 1960 - 8.5"

December 10-13, 1960 - 9.0" 

February 2-5, 1961 - 13.1"

February 11-14, 1964 - 9.0"

February 8-10, 1969 - 2.1"

February 5-7, 1978 - 14.3"

April 5-7, 1982 - 3.4"

February 18-20, 1979 - 15.2"

February 8-11, 1994 - 8.6"

February 3-4, 1995 - 10.5"

March 31/April 1st, 1997 - 13.7"

December 30/31, 2000 - 0.7"

February 5/6, 2010 - 18.3"

December 26/27, 2010 - 7.0"

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THE 5-7 MARCH 2001 (NO-SHOW) SNOWSTORM


This storm was notable due to the public reaction--and even outrage--that resulted from the botched forecasts. Computer models on Friday, March 2, were suggesting that near blizzard conditions would develop from VA to Southern New England. NOAA's HPC (Hydrometeorological Prediction Center) said:


THERE MAY BE BEACH EROSION AND COASTAL FLOODING ... ALONG WITH WINDS EXCEEDING GALE FORCE ALONG THE IMMEDIATE COAST. FARTHER INLAND ... MODERATE TO HEAVY SNOW AND BLOWING SNOW FROM VA THRU THE SOUTHERN HALF OF NEW ENGLAND. LOW WIND CHILLS WITH TEMPS GENERALLY IN THE HIGH TEENS TO MID 20S. THERE COULD EVEN BE THUNDERSNOW. SNOW ACCUMULATIONS MAY EXCEED A FOOT FROM NORTHERN AND CENTRAL VIRGINIA NORTHEASTWARD THRU THE MAJOR METROPOLITAN AREAS


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Yeah, that Jan 22-23 storm in 2005 had some decent snow from the initial low across the area (3 to 6 inches) and then the coastal low really cranked good additional snows from Philly north and east (I felt fortunate to get a total of 12 inches in Spring Mount, PA from the storm...didn't have to go very far southwest to see much lower amounts).

 

Would Feb 25-26 of 2010 count as a Miller B (replacing Feb 5-6 which was a Miller A)?  That storm certainly had the same kind of sharp cutoff of snows to the south and west as a typical Miller B.

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Yeah, that Jan 22-23 storm in 2005 had some decent snow from the initial low across the area (3 to 6 inches) and then the coastal low really cranked good additional snows from Philly north and east (I felt fortunate to get a total of 12 inches in Spring Mount, PA from the storm...didn't have to go very far southwest to see much lower amounts).

 

Would Feb 25-26 of 2010 count as a Miller B (replacing Feb 5-6 which was a Miller A)?  That storm certainly had the same kind of sharp cutoff of snows to the south and west as a typical Miller B.

hmm.. i'd have to review, it definitely came up the coast though, so i'm leaning towards no.  i seem to vaguely recall that it was some kind of super phaser... i forget the details now.

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