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6 Inch Plus Snowstorms by Decade


chescowx
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With the snow season potentially drawing near I thought I would go back and analyze 6" + snowstorms by decade to see if we really did have bigger snowstorms back when my dad was a kid...still a chance this current decade could be a top 4 snowiest on record...with a little luck!

Here are the Chester County 6" + Snowstorms ranked by snowiest decade:

1 - 1960's - 19

2 - 1910's - 19

3 - 1900's - 19

4 - 2000's - 16

5 - 1980's - 16

6 - 1930's - 16

7 - 1920's - 15

8 - This decade (partial) - 11

9 - 1950's - 11

10 - 1990's - 9

11 - 1970's - 9

12 - 1940's - 8

 

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1 hour ago, Rainshadow said:

Philadelphia (6" or more):

1950s.....8

1960s.....10

1970s.....7

1980s.....8

1990s.....5

2000s.....11

2010s.....11

 

Tony - really surprised to see that this decade is likely to go down as the decade with most significant snow events - great stats! Thanks!

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5 minutes ago, chescopawxman said:

Tony - really surprised to see that this decade is likely to go down as the decade with most significant snow events - great stats! Thanks!

as mentioned before, even though things are warmer, it just seems it's easier to get bigger storms these days. Boom or bust. 

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So when did climate change start? I guess not in the 1960's? I guess it really started happening in the 70's?

2 hours ago, tombo82685 said:

as mentioned before, even though things are warmer, it just seems it's easier to get bigger storms these days. Boom or bust. 

 

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4 hours ago, Rainshadow said:

Philadelphia (6" or more):

1950s.....8

1960s.....10

1970s.....7

1980s.....8

1990s.....5

2000s.....11

2010s.....11

 

May be true about snow, but there is no doubt the sea level is rising and Jersey barrier islands are in danger. Many attempts to replenish sand are being washed away.A serious nor'easter this winter could wreck havoc on the Jersey shore this winter.

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We are going through a good snow cycle now just like we did 100 years ago. Ten-year average snow at phl is up to 30.2" close to the all time peak of 30.5" after winter of 1916-17.  100 years ago there was more consistency with not many clunkers hence the median was much higher hitting a peak of 33.1 vs 24.9 currently. Now we are getting some very big years but more clunkers also.

phlsnow.png

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One of our student volunteers at his university did some research on the snow/climate change topic and did find that snowstorms are more frequent even with the warmer climate or cycle (whatever you want to call it). Likely due to warmer SST offshore to fuel stronger storms. 

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6 minutes ago, Mitchg said:

One of our student volunteers at his university did some research on the snow/climate change topic and did find that snowstorms are more frequent even with the warmer climate or cycle (whatever you want to call it). Likely due to warmer SST offshore to fuel stronger storms. 

I concur.  Probably also with the arctic more ice free why every October is becoming defacto above normal snow coverage in Eurasia.  We dont get the run of the mill winter storm around here any more,  its either feast or famine. 

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11 hours ago, Rainshadow said:

I concur.  Probably also with the arctic more ice free why every October is becoming defacto above normal snow coverage in Eurasia.  We dont get the run of the mill winter storm around here any more,  its either feast or famine. 

Sea ice loss also driving arctic amplification which leads to weaker, wavier jet stream, increased blocking and increased tendency for warm arctic/cold continent  pattern. Area of active research with no strong consensus yet.

http://epic.awi.de/36132/1/Cohenetal_NGeo14.pdf

 

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15 minutes ago, Chubbs said:

Sea ice loss also driving arctic amplification which leads to weaker, wavier jet stream, increased blocking and increased tendency for warm arctic/cold continent  pattern. Area of active research with no strong consensus yet.

http://epic.awi.de/36132/1/Cohenetal_NGeo14.pdf

 

Anything that can as a by-product (increased snow coverage) break the trend line would be a good thing.  This is Carl's top/bottom 10 warmest/coldest @ PHL chart. We added at least two more this year.  This is a sea of red.

Capture3.jpgdd.jpg.76ef91fcf66c9c7153ac5c9ae9922375.jpg

 

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