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8/12-8/13 heavy rain/svr obs


tombo82685
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Both the gfs and euro are in good agreement on a widespread 1-2 inches of rain for the region. We will probably see locations top the 2 inch mark. PWATS out ahead of the cold front surge to 2-2.25 from the lehigh valley on south. Should be some decent forcing to get some convective elements which would give locations higher amounts. Severe wise, the best chance to me looks to be out in central pa down to dc land. They have some decent instability down there. Wouldn't be

 shocked if we see a non severe squall line come through at night. The models seem to have that look on their 6hr precip maps.

Post obs here.

 

10443612_823663190986350_722937134974155

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Ground truth too. Unreal not only the amounts but also where. Total flip of highest amount geographical expectation.  Why in some instances convection just cuts off the advance of heavy pcpn and concentrates in one area vs other times it just carries it through if not enhancing it further is a tough one to figure.

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Ground truth too. Unreal not only the amounts but also where. Total flip of highest amount geographical expectation.  Why in some instances convection just cuts off the advance of heavy pcpn and concentrates in one area vs other times it just carries it through if not enhancing it further is a tough one to figure.

Love that dry nose from east central montco and bucks on northeast

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rain totals

 

000
NOUS41 KPHI 131302
PNSPHI
DEZ001>004-MDZ008-012-015-019-020-NJZ001-007>010-012>027-PAZ054-055-
060>062-067>071-140102-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
SPOTTER REPORTS
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MOUNT HOLLY NJ
902 AM EDT WED AUG 13 2014

THE FOLLOWING ARE UNOFFICIAL OBSERVATIONS TAKEN FOR THE SERIES OF
STORMS THAT HAD AFFECTED OUR REGION. APPRECIATION IS EXTENDED TO
HIGHWAY DEPARTMENTS...COOPERATIVE OBSERVERS...SKYWARN SPOTTERS AND
SOCIAL MEDIA FOR THESE REPORTS. THIS SUMMARY IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON OUR
HOME PAGE AT WEATHER.GOV/PHI

********************STORM TOTAL RAINFALL********************

LOCATION STORM TOTAL TIME/DATE COMMENTS
RAINFALL OF
/INCHES/ MEASUREMENT

DELAWARE

...KENT COUNTY...
SMYRNA 3.36 847 AM 8/13 DEOS
BLACKISTON 2.87 845 AM 8/13 DEOS
KITTS HUMMOCK 2.72 845 AM 8/13 DEOS

...NEW CASTLE COUNTY...
ODESSA 4.10 738 AM 8/13 SOCIAL MEDIA
GLASGOW 3.42 500 AM 8/13 DEOS
NEWARK 3.24 757 AM 8/13 SOCIAL MEDIA
TOWNSEND 3.10 845 AM 8/13 DEOS
BLACKBIRD 3.08 345 AM 8/13 MESONET
MIDDLETOWN 3.05 700 PM 8/12 TRAINED SPOTTER
NEW CASTLE 2.65 500 AM 8/13 DEOS
PRICES CORNER 2.55 738 AM 8/13 TRAINED SPOTTER
WILMINGTON AIRPORT 2.51 200 AM 8/13 ASOS
1 NNE TURN QUIST 2.42 500 PM 8/12 COCORAHS
WHITE CLAY CREEK 2.34 845 AM 8/13 DEOS
1 WNW GLASGOW 2.33 500 PM 8/12 COCORAHS
PIKE CREEK 2.22 845 AM 8/13 DEOS
WILMINGTON 2.06 845 AM 8/13 DEOS
CLAYMONT 2.02 845 AM 8/13 DEOS

MARYLAND

...CECIL COUNTY...
ELKTON 3.51 821 AM 8/13 COCORAHS

...KENT COUNTY...
ROCK HALL 4.60 850 PM 8/12 SOCIAL MEDIA
GALENA 3.64 545 AM 8/13 TRAINED SPOTTER
1 SE BETTERTON 3.17 715 PM 8/12 MESONET

...QUEEN ANNE`S COUNTY...
ROMANCOKE 8.47 100 AM 8/13 NWS EMPLOYEE
CENTREVILLE 7.60 240 AM 8/13 TRAINED SPOTTER
CENTREVILLE LANDING 6.06 930 PM 8/12 MESONET
STEVENSVILLE 3.57 930 PM 8/12 MESONET
CLOVERFIELDS 3.10 830 PM 8/12 TRAINED SPOTTER

NEW JERSEY

...ATLANTIC COUNTY...
ESTELL MANOR 6.17 630 AM 8/13 CO-OP OBSERVER
ATLANTIC CITY AIRPOR 5.58 200 AM 8/13 ASOS
MAYS LANDING 4.78 600 AM 8/13 COCORAHS
MULLICA TWP 4.14 500 AM 8/13 NJWXNET
OCEANVILLE 3.93 230 AM 8/13 MESONET
HAMMONTON 3.47 736 AM 8/13 CO-OP OBSERVER
MARGATE CITY 2.54 738 AM 8/13 CO-OP OBSERVER
SOMERS POINT 2.40 500 AM 8/13 PUBLIC

...BURLINGTON COUNTY...
CHATSWORTH 4.76 230 AM 8/13 MESONET
MOUNT LAUREL 2.38 729 AM 8/13 NWS EMPLOYEE
TABERNACLE 2.04 300 AM 8/13 PUBLIC

...CAMDEN COUNTY...
BLUE ANCHOR 3.96 230 AM 8/13 MESONET
SICKLERVILLE 2.56 600 AM 8/13 NWS EMPLOYEE

...CAPE MAY COUNTY...
WOODBINE 2.68 345 AM 8/13 MESONET

...CUMBERLAND COUNTY...
MILLVILLE AIRPORT 8.94 300 AM 8/13 ASOS
NEWPORT 8.60 400 AM 8/13 TRAINED SPOTTER
1 NW LEAMINGS MILL 6.40 1145 PM 8/12 MESONET
2 SSE NORTH VINELAND 5.22 1145 PM 8/12 MESONET
BRIDGETON 5.00 820 AM 8/13 SOCIAL MEDIA
1 SE RAMMEL MILL 4.33 1145 PM 8/12 MESONET
VINELAND 4.26 722 AM 8/13 TRAINED SPOTTER
GREENWICH 2.49 230 AM 8/13 MESONET

...GLOUCESTER COUNTY...
3 W FRANKLIN TWP 5.19 1230 AM 8/13 COCORAHS
WEST DEPTFORD TWP 3.26 700 AM 8/13 SOCIAL MEDIA
WASHINGTON TWP 2.91 110 AM 8/13 TRAINED SPOTTER
SEWELL 2.49 700 AM 8/13 TRAINED SPOTTER

...MONMOUTH COUNTY...
MANASQUAN 5.91 710 AM 8/13 CO-OP OBSERVER
WALL TWP 4.94 500 AM 8/13 NJWXNET
NEPTUNE CITY 4.76 755 AM 8/13 SOCIAL MEDIA
SEA GIRT 4.56 500 AM 8/13 NJWXNET
BELMAR AIRPORT 3.28 500 AM 8/13 AWOS

...OCEAN COUNTY...
LITTLE EGG HARBOR TW 7.50 200 AM 8/13 TRAINED SPOTTER
MANAHAWKIN 7.25 200 AM 8/13 COCORAHS
2 NNE STAFFORD TWP 7.25 200 AM 8/13 COCORAHS
POINT PLEASANT 5.90 500 AM 8/13 NJWXNET
BRICK TWP 5.40 300 AM 8/13 TRAINED SPOTTER
1 SSW PINEWALD 5.27 115 AM 8/13 MESONET
SE BRICK TWP 5.10 852 AM 8/13 SOCIAL MEDIA
BARNEGAT 5.00 846 AM 8/13 SOCIAL MEDIA
MANTOLOKING 4.63 733 AM 8/13 SOCIAL MEDIA
SEASIDE HEIGHTS 4.59 500 AM 8/13 NJWXNET
TOMS RIVER 4.39 230 AM 8/13 TRAINED SPOTTER
LAKEWOOD 4.02 515 AM 8/13 MESONET
BARNEGAT LIGHT 3.67 345 AM 8/13 MESONET
TOMS RIVER AIRPORT 3.29 200 AM 8/13 AWOS
LONG BEACH PARK 2.94 746 AM 8/13 SOCIAL MEDIA

...SALEM COUNTY...
WOODSTOWN 2.53 230 AM 8/13 MESONET
MANNINGTON MILLS 2.15 837 AM 8/13 SOCIAL MEDIA

$

STAFF

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Pennsylvania wasn't even worth mentioning in the rainfall report huh? In 24 hours, we only got .39 inches of rain in Sellersville, PA.  The lawn will green up for a day and then turn brown again by the weekend. We need some substantial rain, not 9 inches like Millville, but a couple of inches would be nice.

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Ground truth too. Unreal not only the amounts but also where. Total flip of highest amount geographical expectation.  Why in some instances convection just cuts off the advance of heavy pcpn and concentrates in one area vs other times it just carries it through if not enhancing it further is a tough one to figure.

I was speculating that this was a case of CSI. I couldn't think of anything else that could create that type of banding in a non-frontogenetic zone. I have no idea if this is right.

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I was speculating that this was a case of CSI. I couldn't think of anything else that could create that type of banding in a non-frontogenetic zone. I have no idea if this is right.

Wasn't there a warm front draped across that area to? I was thinking it might of been from the convergence of the southerly winds and northeast winds. Then later on the formation of the low pressure.

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Wasn't there a warm front draped across that area to? I was thinking it might of been from the convergence of the southerly winds and northeast winds. Then later on the formation of the low pressure.

Yeah, but that would have shown up in the frontogenesis parameters, which weren't particularly impressive

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Pennsylvania wasn't even worth mentioning in the rainfall report huh? In 24 hours, we only got .39 inches of rain in Sellersville, PA.  The lawn will green up for a day and then turn brown again by the weekend. We need some substantial rain, not 9 inches like Millville, but a couple of inches would be nice.

Here is an updated rain total summary. http://forecast.weather.gov/product.php?site=NWS&issuedby=PHI&product=PNS&format=CI&version=1&glossary=0

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I was speculating that this was a case of CSI. I couldn't think of anything else that could create that type of banding in a non-frontogenetic zone. I have no idea if this is right.

 

There may have been a meso-low involved along with a coastal front. We saw impressive inflow from the east and southeast along and ahead of the intense rainfall/convection, and there was some wind shifts from southeast to northeast ahead of it. Combine the focused lift and coastal convergence within an airmass characterized by PWATS of 2.4 inches, resulted in very impressive rainfall rates and totals.

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Its deja vu all over again (August 20-21, 1997), thankfully not as bad...

 

Torrential rain fell across southeast New Jersey as a low pressure system developed over the Delmarva Peninsula and slowly moved northeast across southern New Jersey. A series of thunderstorms developed along this low pressure system's frontal boundaries and trained or moved over the same areas. This caused extremely heavy rain to fall over several hours across eastern parts of Atlantic County. The county bore the brunt of the storm and the flooding with storm totals in excess of 8 inches from Estell Manor through Galloway Township. The storm total at the Atlantic City International Airport of 13.52 inches represented by far a greater than 100 year storm for the area. A 100-year-storm for this area is 7.25 inches. While total damage was estimated at 54 million dollars, miraculously the only injury occurred the afternoon of the 21st when a Galloway Township boy injured his back and neck diving into the flood waters. Several major roadways and bridges collapsed or were completely washed out. The governor declared a state of emergency for the county on the 21st and the county was eventually declared a federal disaster area.

In Galloway Township, the hardest hit area, about 1,100 homes suffered damage. This represented about 10 percent of all the township housing. The most damage was occurred in the Pomona Oaks Development as 75 homes were badly flooded as a drainage pond filled and backed up. The Osprey Court Development was also badly flooded. The Atlantic City Medical Center was closed to emergencies as its first floor and basement were flooded. Emergency personnel pumped out 1.8 million gallons of water from the center. The adjacent Bacharach Rehabilitation Center was also flooded. Flooding also damaged the Absegami High School and several facilities at the Richard Stockton College.

The Atlantic City International Airport was closed at 1230 a.m. EDT on the 21st when power was knocked out to the runways and street flooding closed access to the airport. The airport reopened at 1130 a.m. EDT on the 21st, but had to shut down again at sunset as the runway lights were still not working. The FAA Technical Center was also closed.

In Hamilton Township, three major bridges were closed: The Sugar Hill Bridge on County Road 559, The Gravelly Run Bridge (County Road 559 also) on Ocean Heights Avenue and the bridge between the Lake Lenape Dam and the Great Harbor River. Persons in homes near these bridges were evacuated to a senior citizen center. Working around the clock, the Sugar Hill Bridge was repaired in time for the Labor Day Weekend. The two other bridges were repaired by Late September. Two New Jersey Transit buses and 40 passengers became stuck in the flood waters near the Hamilton Mall and had to be rescued. Five thousand books in the Atlantic Community College were damaged by the flooding. Parts of the Black Horse Pike (U.S. Route 40) were closed because the road washed out. Sections of U.S. Route 40 were also closed in Egg Harbor Township. In Abesecon, a 180 foot section of the New Jersey Transit train track was closed after the gravel bed was washed away. In Pleasantville, the motels around U.S. Routes 30 and 40 were evacuated because of the heavy rain and back bay flooding. Several people had to be rescued from their vehicles. At the water treatment plant pumping station, the sediment rate was above acceptable standards. Even though Atlantic City proper escaped the heavy rain, residents had to boil their tap water for several days to make it potable because the city's reservoir in Egg Harbor Township flooded. The United States Geological Survey Gage on the Tuckahoe River at Head of River reached a new record crest of 9.1 feet. This represented a greater than 100 year recurrence interval.

To put the storm total of 13.52 inches at the Atlantic City International Airport in perspective, the all-time certified 24 hour rainfall record for the state of New Jersey is 14.81 inches in Tuckerton (Ocean County) on August 19, 1939. The 11.12 inches of rain that fell through midnight EST on the 20th, was a new all-time daily record. The previous 24 hour record was 6.46 inches set on July 10, 1949. The 13.52 inches also broke the PREVIOUS ALL-TIME MONTHLY RECORD of 13.09 inches set in July of 1959. August 1997 would have a new rainfall record of 16.12 inches at the airport. Other storm totals from Atlantic County included 12.7 inches in Mays Landing, 12.6 inches in Estell Manor, and 10.21 inches in Pleasantville.


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