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Great American Eclipse


TTNwatcher
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August 21, of course.  Just curious if anyone else was eclipse-chasing and where?  Pending weather, I'll be going to St. Joseph's airport in Missouri (family nearby) for the big event.  I'll be bothering the experts here for some forecast thoughts a couple days before!  Suntan lotion, approved glasses and binoculars, and even elcipse T-shirts ready....

 

Couple links with info:

https://www.greatamericaneclipse.com/

https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse.html

 

I'm so excited I finally started a topic!  Lol

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2 hours ago, TTNwatcher said:

August 21, of course.  Just curious if anyone else was eclipse-chasing and where?  Pending weather, I'll be going to St. Joseph's airport in Missouri (family nearby) for the big event.  I'll be bothering the experts here for some forecast thoughts a couple days before!  Suntan lotion, approved glasses and binoculars, and even elcipse T-shirts ready....

 

Couple links with info:

https://www.greatamericaneclipse.com/

https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse.html

 

I'm so excited I finally started a topic!  Lol

I've thought long and hard about how to get myself and the kids to this, but it just isn't happening for a variety of reasons. So you'll have to enjoy it on our behalf. I remember helping my mom make a shoebox viewer for a partial eclipse back in the early 70s. It was interesting, but I'm sure no where near as interesting as a total eclipse.

One thing I noticed after looking over the greatamericaneclipse site: the total eclipse duration is really pretty short. I guess you are going there primarily for visiting family...

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54 minutes ago, frankdp23 said:

I'll be in the outer banks on vacation during the eclipse.  I think where I am will have about 89% coverage

I would day if its at all possible get to midline for the eclipse. 89%actually wont look much different than normal surprisingly.  You're so close already!

http://www.eclipse2017.org/2017/faq.htm

 

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I will second the point above that, from what I have read, a partial eclipse, even 90+ percent, is nothing at all like totality, which is supposedly the most awesome natural event that can be witnessed, according to some. There is a great thread on Stormtrack.org about the eclipse. Also you have to check out this link, which overlays the path on Google Map satellite view, with detailed stats for any point you click (this link will probably take you to Nebraska but it's interactive so just zoom out).

http://xjubier.free.fr/en/site_pages/solar_eclipses/TSE_2017_GoogleMapFull.html?Lat=42.31895&Lng=-103.06892&Zoom=11&LC=1

I am heading out to the Nebraska Panhandle to chase totality. Why there, you ask?
- I want to be in a flat, rural area where I can see the 360-degree sunset and watch the shadow race toward me
- The resulting darkness will be more pronounced because of the lack of city lights
- Avoid metro area crowds
- I am familiar with, and enjoy, the area, after 20 years of storm chasing vacations on the Plains.
- Opportunity to share with my wife and kids an area of the country that I have come to enjoy from storm chasing, a region that they may otherwise never have a reason to visit
- Ability to tack on a weekend in the Denver/Boulder area before the eclipse, another place I love and that my family has never been to
- After a really crappy storm chasing trip this past year, it will be nice to at least be back in that region. Even without storms, there is an emotional attachment that I associate with some amazing past chasing experiences.
- Reasonable possibility that there may be some chasing opportunities in eastern CO/WY the weekend before. Not that I expect tornados or supercells, but even a garden-variety discrete storm will be nice after my non-eventful chasing trip in late May / early June. And it would be awesome to give my family a taste of what it's like to view an isolated storm on the open prairies (yes, I know, they will probably be interested for about three minutes at most [emoji849])
- Heading up to Mt. Rushmore after the eclipse, just for the afternoon

Just hoping that any storms I am wishing for don't result in an ongoing morning MCS. Most people on Stormtrack think that region, at that time of day (around noon), should be relatively cloud-free. Still, I will be prepared to change course based on forecasts or nowcasts if needed.

Main thing I am worried about is traffic, it is almost 4 hours from Boulder to my target in Nebraska and I am planning to be on the road by 4:30 or 5:30am to allow for traffic from other eclipse chasers.



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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1 hour ago, Qtown Snow said:

the coolest part to me would be as Jim said, the darkness during the day in a rural area.

hope all these people dont look at it with no eye protection.

Interesting point, you should always look at a partial eclipse with eye protection, but totality you actually have to look at with bare eyes, the glasses blot out everything under the low light conditions of totality. 

 

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I was thinking of all the possibilities of how to get down there, where to stay, and such when I realized that the total eclipse will only last a couple of minutes. It's a unique experience and all, but two minutes? That's a long drive...

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51 minutes ago, snowlurker said:

I was thinking of all the possibilities of how to get down there, where to stay, and such when I realized that the total eclipse will only last a couple of minutes. It's a unique experience and all, but two minutes? That's a long drive...

Definitely understand that.  For me, this is a scientific can't miss, rich in history and fascinating to see.  Additionally, there are several hours of partial eclipse under the centerline as well.  Nonetheless, as you said, a long drive, lol.  Luckily I'm flying! 

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AM glad for the invite from our friends for the long weekend. Still remember the total eclipse I saw in 1963 from my hospital bed where they gave me exposed x-ray film to watch the eclipse. Found out as an adult that exposed x-ray film is not recommended for viewing.

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2 hours ago, snowlurker said:

I was thinking of all the possibilities of how to get down there, where to stay, and such when I realized that the total eclipse will only last a couple of minutes. It's a unique experience and all, but two minutes? That's a long drive...

Think of it as a once in a lifetime event, duration aside. 

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27 minutes ago, tombo82685 said:

Isn't there one in 2024 too that will be closer to us lol?

There is, it hits a strip thru somewhere around Ohio-ish.  I'm not waiting,  lol, besides my daughter will be too old (and not old enough) to want to go lol.

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1 hour ago, Harbourton said:

In 1970, went to Wilson NC to get into the total eclipse when I was in college. Totally awesome. I can't imagine what our ancestors thought was happening. The pearl that appears just before totality was mind blowing.

Yeah that's the stuff!  This is  a generational event, really! Except unlike Woodstock, 50 million people can Actually be there lol.

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