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rramblings

how to account for "dusting of snow" in my annual snowfall totals

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Ok, question. I have had five events where I said I had a dusting of snow, that is snow fall of under a tenth of an inch. How do I account for these events. As I have had five of these events, I have added 1/2 an inch to my 2016-17 snowfall totals. Thanks for your help. Of course this is only for our purposes, but I would like my figures to have some validity.;)

Snowfall, Flemington area, Hunterdon County NJ

March 3, 2017 light dusting

February 9, 2017 5.1 inches

January 31, 2017 trace

January 13, 2017 .8 inches

January 7, 2017 1.7 inches

January 5-6, 2017, 4:05 AM 1.1 inches.

December 16-17, 2016 .6 inches snow; .6 inches ice

December 11-12, 2016 trace

December 5 2016, light dusting

November 19-20, 2016: light dusting

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I don't think anyone here would ridicule you or I or anyone else with rounding up a dusting to 0.1". I know myself I've "recorded" 3 - 0.1" events this winter. 

There have definitely been a handful of "traces" that I've simply left off my list although if I was keeping daily logs I'd surely make note of it. I'd like to think those whopping 0.1" events were from something more appreciable weatherwise like a snow squall vs. scattered flurries on a general overcast, cold day.

5/9 of my snow events are either 0.1" or 0.2" this winter! :facepalm:

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Thanks Parsley and Tom. :smileys-snowman-053129: Of course this begs the question of the distinction between a trace of snow and a dusting. I read somewhere that a trace of snow was snow that melted on the ground?

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35 minutes ago, rramblings said:

Thanks Parsley and Tom. :smileys-snowman-053129: Of course this begs the question of the distinction between a trace of snow and a dusting. I read somewhere that a trace of snow was snow that melted on the ground?

Yeah, kind of like a rain so light and short in duration it barely dampens the pavement.  

Flurries at temperatures above freezing would be a good winter example. 

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18 hours ago, Parsley said:

Yeah, kind of like a rain so light and short in duration it barely dampens the pavement.  

Flurries at temperatures above freezing would be a good winter example. 

Thanks Parsley! I think that I misclassified one or two of my "trace" events where I did see some snow that was not measurable. If the snow melted on contact with the ground I usually did not note it in my precip logs.

 

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Technically any snow that reaches the ground, melting on contact or not, is a "trace". That varies from those that melt on contact to those which whiten the ground but don't quite measure to 0.05".

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